Student Spotlight 22′: Alexander Bilochenko, U.S. Navy

Tell us about yourself.

I am from Kherson, Ukraine, but I moved to the U.S. when I was 10. I grew up in Tucson, AZ, and decided to join the Navy after high school. I chose the Navy over a full-ride scholarship to the University of Arizona because I had a strong desire to give back to the country that saved my life. America welcomed me with open arms and provided opportunities I wouldn’t have otherwise had. 

My job was a Fire Controlman First Class aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Antietam. Specifically, I worked on the computer equipment used to process ballistic and radar targeting data, which our ship’s weapons systems used. I also joined the ship’s “flying squad,” which was the rapid response team handling damage control while underway. Despite being promoted to E-6 after four years and on the fast track to E-7, I decided to separate from the Navy to pursue higher education at the University of Chicago. 

An interesting fact about myself is that I’ve been meditating for nearly a decade and can confidently say that it has been nothing short of a software upgrade for my mind. I learned mindfulness from Theravada Buddhist monks in Tucson and reinforced my understanding by attending a silent Vipassana meditation retreat in rural Japan. I have also continued my practice with help from Sam Harris’ app “Waking Up.” 

What was your educational background prior to attending WSP, and which of our courses did you attend? 

I attended a nationally ranked public college preparatory high school and, as previously mentioned, turned down a full-ride scholarship to the University of Arizona to join the Navy. I took online classes through Arizona State University while working 80 to 100-hour weeks during my enlistment. About halfway through my contract, I learned about Service to School and the Warrior-Scholar Project, both of which inspired me to shoot for the stars. I applied for Warrior-Scholar Project and attended the humanities and business & entrepreneurship boot camps at the University of Southern California.

A year from the end of my service obligation, I applied to the University of Chicago through their unique enrolling admission option for veterans and was admitted three weeks later. Securing my future ahead of time was important. As one of the most knowledgeable sailors aboard the ship, I gave my full effort until the day I walked off the brow for the last time. Because I did so, my commanding officer granted me nearly 90 days of leave, allowing me to make it to Chicago on time to attend school. My advice to people nearing the end of their service is to finish strong: give yourself something to be proud of.

Why did you decide to participate in WSP this summer, and was there a shift in your confidence level from the first day of the course to the last day?

Although I had already secured admission to one of the country’s best colleges, I attended WSP because the organization had inspired me early on in my journey. I didn’t have a chance to participate while in the military due to being forward-deployed throughout my service. I was excited to have an opportunity to finally attend an academic boot camp at USC before starting classes at UChicago in the fall.

Additionally, I wanted to meet like-minded veterans while tapping into one of the best alumni networks in the country. I figured that veterans attending WSP would be among the best & brightest our services had to offer, and I was not disappointed. They were some of the most motivated and inspirational service members I’ve ever met!

What were some key insights you gained during your courses, and what is your biggest takeaway? 

I came into WSP fairly confident in my ability to succeed in the classroom, and I knew that I could learn anything through hard work. My confidence level remained high; however, I was humbled in the sense that I understood the importance of being able to triage assignments and plan rest. Most days, I studied from 7 am until midnight, which would’ve been unsustainable had I not triaged the unimportant. As UChicago has a notoriously rigorous curriculum, I’m glad to have learned that skill in a setting that doesn’t impact my official academic record.

I already touched on this, but I can’t overemphasize the importance of understanding your key priorities. It could be getting a perfect score, clarifying your thoughts, networking, or any number of other possibilities. Let me be clear: you can do anything, but you can’t do everything.

Another important insight was the value of Socratic discourse. In the military, philosophical discussion as it pertains to the mission is either one-sided or curt. In an academic setting, it’s perfectly fine to talk about something with no end goal in mind, and it’s okay to speak to clarify one’s thinking or to challenge an idea that seems shortsighted or misinformed.

I also learned that it’s okay to ask for help and that it’s okay not to have all the answers. Both can be frowned upon in a military setting, especially when one is in a leadership position. In the classroom, those who are willing to be vulnerable are the ones who learn the most… and those who learn the most are the ones who succeed in their studies.

In one word, how would you describe your overall experience?

Powerful!

We would love to get to know you better, so please tell us about yourself.

I am from Southern California, specifically the Inland Empire, where I have spent much of my life. I currently reside in Hemet, CA. I served in the U.S. Navy as a machinist’s mate, and my calling to serve in the military resulted from the 9/11 terrorist attacks. I had just graduated high school and was working odd jobs while attending community college when the attacks occurred. I was already considering serving in the military, but the outcome of that day thrust me forward into serving my country. 

An interesting fact about myself is that I am a graduate of Veterans Treatment Court (VTC) in Riverside, CA. I struggled and stumbled after military service, but the court gave me a second chance. They ensured I got the help I needed rather than have me serve a prison sentence. While going through VTC, I took my mental health seriously, which helped me return to community college. It is here where I unpacked my true calling of helping others.

One way I help others is by serving as the student veteran representative for the diversity council, where I act as a voice for veterans regarding diversity, equity, and inclusion. I am also the president of a student-led organization that supports formerly incarcerated and system-impacted students called the Underground Scholars Initiative.  

What was your educational background prior to attending WSP, and which of our courses did you attend? 

Before attending the WSP humanities course this past summer at the University of Pennsylvania, I had already completed my community college honors program. During this program, I completed five faculty-mentored research papers and graduated in 2019 with three associate degrees. In 2020, I transferred to the University of California, Riverside (UCR), where I graduated with a bachelor’s degree. 

While at UCR, I was selected as one of fourteen undergraduates to be a 21’-22’ Chancellor’s Research Fellow. I conducted a year-long faculty-mentored independent research project and completed a two-quarter senior thesis project. UCR is a large academic research institution with a rigorous academic curriculum, and I have been privileged to present my work at various levels. 

Why did you decide to participate in WSP this summer, and was there a shift in your confidence level from the first day of the course to the last day? 

It was a serendipitous occurrence. I was looking to get involved with a different veteran’s organization when a misstep in my typing populated Warrior-Scholar Project in my Google search. Although I was about to finish my bachelor’s degree, I still saw value in attending WSP. I felt the program would offer something unique to my academic experience, mainly because I would be in a classroom of only veterans and active duty service members. Also, the stipend made the choice a no-brainer. If it weren’t for the financial assistance, I wouldn’t have attended WSP. Thank you tremendously to the donors who made that happen!

Even though I went to college for nearly four years, I still had reservations. I knew I would survive the rigorous academic week, but I was worried about being in a classroom rich in military culture. I go to college with over 200 student veterans, but we are rarely in the same classroom. Being out of the military for 15 years and interacting with a younger generation made me nervous. This was absolved rather quickly as the WSP Fellows were professional, kind, humble, and exhibited a sincere desire for growth in academia. I am now thrilled to call each of them a friend. 

When I left Upenn, my confidence was through the roof. Although I successfully pursued my undergrad, I never considered applying to an Ivy League school for my graduate degree because imposter syndrome had hit me hard. My experience at UPenn helped me find confidence in knowing that I can survive and thrive at an Ivy League institution and that I am needed there. I am excited to say that I have reset the bar for graduate schools that I will be applying to this cycle.

What were some key insights you gained during your courses, and what is your biggest takeaway? 

My biggest takeaway is that civic service is a fundamental necessity for American democracy to work, and to be of service is to position the greater good of society before self. Ensuring all members of the American mosaic are represented democratically and equally moves forward our campaign to form a “more perfect union.” This endeavor depends on all members of the American fabric to participate in civic service. Indeed, for a democratic republic to function effectively and equitably, “We the People” are responsible for the well-being of one another. 

My time at UPenn empowered me with a rich sense of confidence in knowing that the enlisted veteran’s voice unequivocally needs to be present in higher education classrooms. Being part of a community and engaging in thought-provoking conversations with my cohort inspired me to pivot away from my earlier plans of pursuing a Ph.D. in History and instead pursue professional degrees in public policy and law. This is just one example of the exemplary power of WSP.

In one word, how would you describe your overall experience?

Fulfilling!

*View Greg’s LinkedIn profile here.

Tell us about yourself.

I am from Cambridge Springs, PA, and I currently serve in the U.S Navy out of Norfolk, VA. As a teenager, I knew that I wanted to join the military because I wasn’t sure what I wanted to study in college. Currently, I have two jobs in the Navy, one as an airframe mechanic (AM) and the other as an intelligence analyst (CTR). 

What was your educational background prior to attending WSP, and which of our courses did you attend? 

I was homeschooled from second grade through my senior year. I also completed two military MOS schools and three college classes through Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. I attended business week at the University of Southern California (USC) and humanities week at the University of California, Irvine (UCI). I enjoyed attending a program at different universities, as it allowed me to gain two different perspectives on higher education.

Why did you decide to participate in WSP this summer, and was there a shift in your confidence level from the first day of the course to the last day? 

I signed up for WSP because I wanted to learn more about college, and I was especially interested in getting a feel for the academic rigor I could expect. I also looked forward to talking with the professors and meeting fellow veterans with similar interests. If I’m being honest, I wanted to see if I was ready to attend college after the military.

My confidence level on the first day at USC was low. I knew I could handle the courses, but lacked the confidence to speak up, communicate my ideas, and express my opinion. However, my confidence level went up significantly by the final day at UCI. A big part of this was because the WSP fellows from both weeks took the time to answer my questions, connect me with mentors, and encourage me not to hold myself back. I am very thankful for the opportunity to attend.

What were some key insights you gained during your courses, and what is your biggest takeaway? 

Attending WSP helped me gain a fuller picture of what it is like to attend college. It also gave me a better understanding of how to apply to college, the limitations, the amount of financial aid available, and the seemingly endless veteran resources available to me. Although knowing these things are valuable, the most important thing I learned was how to regain confidence in myself. I know this sounds cheesy, but it’s the truth.

In one word, how would you describe your overall experience?

Invaluable!

*View Hannah’s LinkedIn profile here.

FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. — FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE — National nonprofit Warrior-Scholar Project (WSP) is thrilled to announce that it has partnered with Fayetteville State University (FSU) to help veterans succeed in higher education – making FSU the first historically black university to host a WSP academic boot camp. The partnership is the latest significant step the university has taken to increase veteran and multi-generation student support. FSU will host its first WSP Humanities Academic Boot Camp from June 11-18. 

“As a premier destination for military-connected students, Fayetteville State University is proud to host the first Warrior-Scholar Project boot camp at an HBCU to prepare enlisted veterans to succeed in their post-military careers,” said FSU Chancellor Darrell T. Allison. “Just like the military-connected students who call Bronco Nation their ‘home,’ we have embraced an institutional commitment to serving our community and those who have sacrificed in the defense of our nation.” 

During the WSP-FSU Academic Boot Camp, participants will have the opportunity to learn from FSU faculty, receive mentoring from fellow student veterans, and begin to adjust to a formal learning environment. A recent study by the D’Aniello Institute for Veterans and Military Families found that WSP is the only national program of its kind dedicated to veterans that not only provides targeted support for academic success, but also improves social connection and relationships with both faculty and nonveteran students. 

“Transitioning from the military into an educational setting can be daunting, but we want to show enlisted veterans that their unique skills, viewpoints, and experiences are not only welcomed, but they enrich any campus, including ours,” said Siobhan R. Norris, FSU Associate Vice Chancellor for Military Affairs and Army veteran.

As a pillar of its mission, WSP is dedicated to addressing the education gap that exists for enlisted service members and veterans, particularly those from marginalized communities, and the partnership allows the nonprofit to deepen its commitment to supporting people of color in higher education. 

“WSP knows that the diverse experiences of those who serve provide them with a unique skill set to be successful in higher education and beyond. Our partnership with Fayetteville State University allows us to better serve all veterans and increase access to quality higher education,” said WSP CEO Ryan Pavel. “We are incredibly excited to expand our program to FSU and bring this life-changing experience to a historically black college campus.” 

WSP launched its first boot camp at Yale University in 2012 with nine participants. Since then, the program has expanded to 24 of America’s top schools and has helped nearly 2,000 veterans get a head start in higher education. 

About Warrior-Scholar Project

Warrior-Scholar Project (WSP) empowers enlisted veterans and service members to excel at four-year universities. Through intensive and immersive one- to two-week academic boot camps, participants gain skills required for success and support for the cultural shift from the military to higher education at top-tier schools. Throughout WSP’s free resident education programs, students are traditionally housed on campus, and engage in challenging discussions with accomplished professors, receiving tailored instruction on key skills like analytical reading and college-level writing. Warrior-Scholar Project is a national nonprofit with programs at public and private colleges and universities across the country. For more information, visit www.warrior-scholar.org.

About Fayetteville State University
Fayetteville State University is a constituent institution of The University of North Carolina System and the second-oldest public institution of higher education in the state, having been founded in 1867. FSU is a historically black university offering degrees at the baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral levels. With more than 6,700 students, Fayetteville State University is among the most diverse institutions in the nation. To learn more about Fayetteville State University, visit www.uncfsu.edu.

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Conducted by the D’Aniello Institute for Veterans and Military Families, the evaluation highlights the value WSP brings to veterans throughout their transition from the military

WASHINGTON, D.C. — FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE — National nonprofit Warrior-Scholar Project (WSP) was founded to ensure that every degree-seeking enlisted veteran and transitioning service member succeeds in their pursuit of higher education and beyond, and a recent study by Syracuse University’s D’Aniello Institute for Veterans and Military Families (IVMF) confirmed the organization is prospering in that mission. Thanks to generous funding provided by the A. James & Alice B. Clark Foundation, WSP retained the D’Aniello Institute for the two-year evaluation, which was completed in March 2022. As a result of the analysis, WSP is proud to say it offers the only program of its kind dedicated to veterans with a national reach providing targeted support for humanities and STEM degrees. 

“The Foundation has been a strong supporter of Warrior-Scholar Project for four years, and believes strongly in the impact and uniqueness of their program,” said Mike Monroe, director of veterans’ initiatives at the A. James & Alice B. Clark Foundation. “CEO Ryan Pavel and his team have done a tremendous job growing the organization while maintaining high-quality programming and a laser focus on supporting their veteran scholars.”

The extensive evaluation included a comprehensive literature review that focused on student veteran research, program logic modeling of WSP academic boot camps, and a full analysis of the nonprofit’s annual alumni survey. Key findings include: 

  • No other program offers all that WSP provides to military veterans. 
  • Compared to WSP, no other veteran-specific programs have a national reach (in person or virtual) with curricula that covers both humanities and STEM subject areas. 
  • Qualitative data analysis revealed that WSP is contributing to academic success, increasing motivation for veteran students, and helping to bridge the gap between veterans and civilians. 
  • 92% of the survey population reported that WSP helped them be more successful academically. 
  • 73% of the survey population reported that WSP motivated them to apply to or attend a college they previously would not have considered. 

“Syracuse University has long been a proud WSP campus partner, passionate about helping student veterans thrive in higher education. And now, the University’s D’Aniello Institute is thrilled to expand the partnership through this evaluation effort,” said Gilly Cantor, IVMF director of evaluation. “We’re pleased to have found that WSP’s programming is informed and grounded by the latest research, and their alumni data demonstrates success across their most important outcomes.”

The study further noted that  “… at this time no other program offers all that WSP provides to its participants [with] components designed to improve social connection, relationships with faculty, knowledge of campus culture, and relationships with nonveteran students, which addresses many of the challenges identified in the literature for veterans as well as other nontraditional students in comparable groups.” 

The IVMF delivers no-cost career training and entrepreneurship programs across the U.S. and globally to ease the transition after service back into communities for military, veterans and their families as well as prepare them for successful careers and business ownership. In its 10 years of operation, the IVMF has impacted more than 170,000 to date. In addition to supporting the D’Aniello Institute’s programmatic efforts, the IVMF also provides national impacting research, policy analysis and program evaluation, working with communities and nonprofits across the nation to enhance service delivery for 18 million veterans. 

WSP launched its first program at Yale University in 2012 with nine participants. Since then, the program has expanded to 24 of America’s top schools and has helped more than 1,700 veterans through academic boot camps and workshops. The introductory academic experience has a lasting impact: 90% of WSP alumni have already completed or are on track to complete their undergraduate degrees, an increase of 18% over the national veteran average. 


About Warrior-Scholar Project

Warrior-Scholar Project (WSP) empowers enlisted veterans and service members to excel at four-year universities. Through intensive and immersive one- to two-week academic boot camps, participants gain skills required for success and support for the cultural shift from the military to higher education at top-tier schools. Throughout WSP’s free resident education programs, students are traditionally housed on campus, and engage in challenging discussions with accomplished professors, receiving tailored instruction on key skills like analytical reading and college-level writing. Warrior-Scholar Project is a national nonprofit with programs at public and private colleges and universities across the country. For more information, visit www.warrior-scholar.org.

About the D’Aniello Institute for Veterans and Military Families

Syracuse University’s D’Aniello Institute for Veterans and Military Families (IVMF) is the first national institute in higher education singularly focused on advancing the lives of the nation’s military, veterans, and their families. Through its professional staff and experts, and with the support of founding partner JPMorgan Chase & Co. as well as U.S. Navy veteran, IVMF Advisory Board Co-Chair, University Life Trustee and Co-Founder & Chairman Emeritus of the Carlyle Group Daniel D’Aniello ’68, H’20 and his wife, Gayle, the IVMF delivers leading national programs in career and entrepreneurship education and training, while also conducting actionable research, policy analysis, and program evaluations. The D’Aniello Institute also supports veterans and their families, once they transition back into civilian life, as they navigate the maze of social services in their communities, enhancing access to this care working side-by-side with local providers across the country. The D’Aniello Institute is committed to advancing and empowering the post-service lives of those who have served in America’s armed forces and their families.

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The program offers veterans expanded support throughout their graduate school education and beyond

WASHINGTON, D.C. — FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE — National nonprofit Warrior-Scholar Project (WSP) is excited to welcome 16 military veterans to its inaugural cohort of Diana Davis Spencer Scholars. Thanks to an investment by the Diana Davis Spencer Foundation, the program provides support and mentorship opportunities to WSP alumni as they continue on their higher education journeys throughout graduate and professional schools, including law and medical schools in addition to masters and Ph.D. programs. 

Earning a bachelor’s degree and gaining acceptance into graduate school is an exciting new chapter for military veterans, but it can also be an overwhelming process to navigate. Diana Davis Spencer Scholars receive expanded support as they embark on this new endeavor, including a step-by-step roadmap to graduate school admission and success. Additionally, scholars work with designated mentors to receive one-on-one support based on their unique needs and establish a set of goals and academic pathways. Scholars also have access to mentoring sessions; receive guidance when applying for funding, fellowships, and internships; and have career shadowing opportunities. 

“The Diana Davis Spencer Foundation has been a transformative WSP supporter for many years. We are deeply grateful for this most recent investment, which allows us to stand up bespoke graduate school supports for talented student veterans. We need many more enlisted veterans in top graduate school programs in all disciplines throughout the country. This inaugural cohort is just the beginning,” said Ryan Pavel, CEO of WSP. 

The Inaugural Diana Davis Spencer Scholars Are: 

  • Conor Abbamonte, Navy, Columbia University alum 
  • Gerson Anton-Juarez, Army, Syracuse University alum
  • Derek Auguste, Army, University of Miami alum
  • Jonathan Banasihan, Navy, American University alum
  • Marcus Bartolome, Marine Corps, senior at Columbia University
  • Angelo Digirolamo, Navy, senior at Columbia University 
  • Lisa Elijah, Air Force, University of Oklahoma alum
  • Harry Foster, Marine Corps, junior at Columbia University 
  • Manny Johnson, Marine Corps, Liberty University alum 
  • DeLia Kennedy, Navy, senior at Hampton University 
  • Oren Morgan, Army, junior at University of California-Los Angeles
  • Andrew Nguyen, Army, senior at Yale University 
  • Daniel Reyes, Navy, senior at Vassar College
  • Moira Ryan, Army, senior at Rivier College
  • Tracy Santos, Marine Corps, junior at University of Rhode Island 
  • Patrick Trujillo, Marine Corps, San Diego State University alum

Read their full bios here

WSP launched its first program at Yale University in 2012 with nine participants. Since then, the program has expanded to 21 of America’s top schools and has helped more than 1,700 veterans through academic boot camps and workshops. The introductory academic experience has a lasting impact: 90% of WSP alumni have already completed or are on track to complete their undergraduate degrees, an increase of 18% over the national veteran average. 

About Warrior-Scholar Project

Warrior-Scholar Project (WSP) empowers enlisted veterans and service members to excel at four-year universities. Through intensive and immersive one- to two-week academic boot camps, participants gain skills required for success and support for the cultural shift from the military to higher education at top-tier schools. Throughout WSP’s free resident education programs, students are traditionally housed on campus, and engage in challenging discussions with accomplished professors, receiving tailored instruction on key skills like analytical reading and college-level writing. Warrior-Scholar Project is a national nonprofit with programs at public and private colleges and universities across the country. For more information, visit www.warrior-scholar.org.

About the Diana Davis Spencer Foundation 

The Diana Davis Spencer Foundation espouses the values upon which our nation was founded: freedom and individual responsibility. The mission of the foundation is to promote national security, entrepreneurship, self-reliance, free enterprise, and to enhance quality of life by supporting the arts, education, global understanding, health advancements, and preservation of the environment.