The College of William and Mary: Humanities Academic Boot Camp (Virtual)

The above dates are tentative and subject to change.

Apply now to be part of our free humanities academic boot camp for service members and veterans in partnership with The College of William and Mary!

This week-long humanities academic boot camp prepares service members and veterans for the challenges and rigor of humanities or liberal arts bachelor’s degree programs. Using the topic of American democracy to guide discussions and assignments, veterans and service members will learn foundational skills to help them succeed with their transition from the military to higher education.

During the week, students are taught by professors from our partner college and mentored by peers who have completed the program and have successfully transitioned to college.

The above dates are tentative and subject to change.

Apply now to be part of our free humanities academic boot camp for service members and veterans in partnership with Fayetteville State University!

This week-long humanities academic boot camp prepares service members and veterans for the challenges and rigor of humanities or liberal arts bachelor’s degree programs. Using the topic of American democracy to guide discussions and assignments, veterans and service members will learn foundational skills to help them succeed with their transition from the military to higher education.

During the week, students are taught by professors from our partner college and mentored by peers who have completed the program and have successfully transitioned to college.

The College of William and Mary was founded in 1693 and is a public research university. It is the only higher education in America that received its charter exclusively from the Crown under the Seal of the Privy Council. According to the school’s website, three U.S. Presidents received their education from the school: James Monroe, Thomas Jefferson, and John Tyler. The student-to-faculty ratio is one of the lowest in the nation at 12:1. This is the first year WSP has partnered with The College of William and Mary.

Location: Williamsburg, VA

Mascot: Griffin

School Colors: Green, Gold, and Silver

Admissions Link

Student Veteran Resources

Apply now to attend WSP at The College of William and Mary

Princeton University Cohort

What was your educational experience prior to WSP? Would you consider yourself a confident student?

I used to be a confident student, maybe too confident because I never did homework but still managed to get decent grades. After encountering a suicide-vehicle-borne IED in 2006 while in Afghanistan, I found learning to be a challenge. I struggled with comprehension, retention, and memory issues. In the years since I had to relearn how to learn, and that’s one of the main reasons I wanted to join WSP. I knew that if I could make it through the week-long intensives, I would be more confident about returning to school full-time.

Had you participated in any sort of virtual learning before? If so, how does your WSP experience compare to that?

The WSP virtual experience was great considering it was virtual! The fellows and professors were so organized and everything was streamlined. They had whiteboards, scratch pads, and being able to share screens was key! The use of Google Drive, Zoom, and the various tools made everything easier.

Why were you excited to participate in WSP?

I love learning and I looked forward to spending time with other veterans who have the same goals and dreams. I knew we’d all connect easily, and develop a support network to cheer us on throughout our educational pursuits.

What have you learned so far that you think will be helpful as you pursue your degree?

The biggest thing I learned was that despite everything I’ve forgotten and all of the learning issues I’ve struggled with since my TBI, I can take classes I thought were impossible for me like Physics and higher-level math. I know how much effort I need to put in but even better than that, I know how to leverage the school’s resources to work smarter and be successful. My STEM week at Princeton was very challenging but thanks to the WSP fellows who never gave up on me when I wanted to, the experience helped me find my confidence. . . and that is priceless.

What were you looking forward to learning during STEM week?

During WSP’s Princeton STEM week, I was looking forward to learning about STEM in general. I’ve always understood it conceptually but had never considered what it would mean to pursue the field. More than anything, I wanted to push myself in subjects that were intimidating to someone who moved around a lot growing up like Physics and HARD math! 🙂

What research project did you work on, and what did you learn from that experience?

Our team worked on using Python programming to evaluate data to see if we could glean information for research purposes. We learned the basics of Python and how to write code that could give us various data results. It was informative and interesting.

Are there any instructors or fellows who have made a difference for you?

I cannot pick just one because every one of them spent time supporting and encouraging me through the hardest parts of the homework. The fellows all rotated the study rooms to make sure we were all progressing. If I didn’t understand something, I could ask multiple fellows who had different styles in explaining and teaching. Hearing something described a different way helped solidify my understanding of the more complex problems and helped me remember. Most people probably don’t need this but with my brain injury, I do. I absolutely love each and every one of them. I cannot emphasize enough how great they are. I will forever be grateful to Dan L., Ana V., Michael B., Dylan P., Logan A., and Patrick H.

Is WSP having any effect on how confident you feel as a student?

Yes, of course. Not only am I more confident in going back to school but I’m also more confident that I can do more than I believed I could.

Princeton University Cohort

What was your educational experience prior to WSP? Would you consider yourself a confident student?

Prior to attending the Warrior-Scholar Project, my educational experience was quite limited. I had attended a few community college courses here and there part-time. 

Had you participated in any sort of virtual learning before? If so, how does your WSP experience compare to that?

I had very little virtual learning experience, aside from webinars, prior to WSP. WSP was an incredibly rigorous, yet rewarding experience. I learned a lot about myself and acquired some valuable skills along the way. 

Why were you excited to participate in WSP?

I was excited to participate in the program because I read about the experiences of others and was inspired by the impact it had on them. 

What have you learned so far that you think will be helpful as you pursue your degree?

I believe both the problem-solving framework and academic reading/writing will be helpful as I pursue my degree. 

What were you looking forward to learning during STEM week?

I was most looking forward to exploring physics during the STEM week. I’ve had some exposure to computer science and mathematics prior to the course but physics wasn’t a subject I had any recent experience with. 


What research project did you work on, and what did you learn from that experience?

My partners and I had the privilege of working with Professor Daniel Marlow on Galactic Exploration of Invisible Light, in which we got to observe radio emissions from the galaxy. This project was a real treat because it called us to draw upon the material we had covered in the reading/lectures and some newly minted Python skills to fully flush out what the data was offering. Not to mention, watching a refurbished Cold War-era dish remotely operated was an experience that will stay with me for the rest of my life.

Are there any instructors or fellows who have made a difference for you?

Literally every single instructor and fellow had a positive impact on me at some point during this course. The example problem breakdowns we collaborated with Lucas Fernandez and Hayden Treu on were particularly helpful in cementing the material we covered in the lectures. 

Is WSP having any effect on how confident you feel as a student?

Absolutely, I am more confident than ever in my ability to succeed as a student after honing skills like time management, effective prioritization, and problem-solving.

Princeton University Cohort

What was your educational experience prior to WSP? Would you consider yourself a confident student? 

I have always been the type of student who goes to class and then straight home. I never asked questions or participated in study groups or even took advantage of professors’ office hours. This was because I didn’t need to do that in grade school or even during the two Air Force technical training schools I attended. I was able to get great grades and understand the material without the need to ask questions, which is not the case anymore. That didn’t help me with projects where I had to work in teams because I was so accustomed to working alone, something that didn’t give me the opportunity to test my confidence. I did not consider myself to be a confident student for a number of reasons, from my age, my strong Puerto Rican accent, my physical appearance, and my visible/invisible disabilities. 

Had you participated in any sort of virtual learning before? If so, how does your WSP experience compare to that?

No, Warrior-Scholar Project was my first virtual learning experience. 


Why were you excited to participate in WSP?
The real reason I was very excited was that I was going to be able to visit, stay at, and take classes at an Ivy League school while getting to meet other veterans who, like me, believe in the power of education and who want to pursue higher education. I also wanted to add more people to my network, while at the same time sharing my networks with them, because I think that the veteran community is like a huge family and we should all be connected one way or another. 

What have you learned so far that you think will be helpful as you pursue your degree?

I learned that I am capable of accomplishing great things and that if I give it my all, I can also help others see themselves reflected in me, believing in their endless possibilities and potential. I also learned that no matter where I came from or how my past looks, I can always strive for more if I really want to. My future is in my hands and there’s plenty of people ready and willing to give me a push when I need it. 

What were you looking forward to learning during STEM week?

I was definitely looking forward to learning about coding, how it can be used, and the doors that will be opened for me in the future. Also, I was interested to learn how diverse STEM careers are, and how there’s something for everyone, something that I wasn’t aware of. 

Are there any instructors or fellows who have made a difference for you this week so far?

For me, the entire team was excellent, from the professors to the brothers and sisters that attended the course with me! I am definitely grateful for that. 
I would like to mention a couple of them in particular. Let me start with Avery Carmichael, one of the fellows that was with us during humanities week. Avery is one of those people who doesn’t say much but is always there to be a cheerleader and to help you see and discover things about you that you thought were not possible. It is hard for me to relax and to feel free to be myself in front of groups, especially because I have been criticized in the past for that. Avery gave me the confidence and helped me feel at ease to be me, even from the distance over a computer screen.

Another person who I would like to thank and recognize is Professor Shaw, also from the humanities week. The first day he was with us, I was intimidated and even questioned if I had made the right decision when I accepted to attend the program. Then I gave him a chance to challenge me and to push me out of my comfort zone when it comes to books and reading selections. Professor Shaw is such a smart and eloquent human being and he made everyone feel okay to share conflicting opinions and learn how to use critical thinking in order to see history from another point of view. That was an eye-opener and something I will definitely use the rest of my life. 

Things I will also like to point out are Lucas’s personality, he is one of those people that everyone likes and can identify with in one way or another; Tyler‘s patience and wisdom while working with my group during the coding and research project, Jessica’s mellow vibes and listening skills. 

Is WSP having any effect on how confident you feel as a student?

The answer is simple: absolutely!